How to use GNU Privacy Guard / GnuPG / GPG / PGP to encrypt email and data

Okay… on this blog, we explained the finer details of GNU Privacy Guard or GPG or GnuPG or PGP. Activities that are required to be performed were explained in detail with the commands to perform them.

However, you would still not be able to connect the dots, without this grand overview of GNU Privacy Guard . . . → Read More: How to use GNU Privacy Guard / GnuPG / GPG / PGP to encrypt email and data

How to receive other people’s GnuPG / PGP public key from a key server into your key ring

You will be able to sign emails using your private key by default. This means that people know that it is your email ID that is the originator of the email. However, if you want to send people encrypted messages, you need to have their public keys in your key ring. You need to get . . . → Read More: How to receive other people’s GnuPG / PGP public key from a key server into your key ring

How to send GPG public key to a PGP key server

After keys have been generated, we need to ensure that we spread our public key far and wide. It can be attached to every email we send to others, but the problem is, it becomes a big pain to do every time.

The easiest way to spread the public key far and wide is to . . . → Read More: How to send GPG public key to a PGP key server

How to export your private key to an ASCII / text file in GnuPG

Once you have generated your key pair, you need to make sure you back it up safely, to prevent the loss of the keys if the computer crashes or is re-installed.

We normally export the private key to an ASCII / text file for safe-keeping off the computer on a USB drive. Basically, as a . . . → Read More: How to export your private key to an ASCII / text file in GnuPG

How to export your public key to an ASCII / text file in GnuPG

Once you have generated your key pair, you need to make sure you back it up safely, to prevent the loss of the keys if the computer crashes or is re-installed.

The reasons the public key is exported to a text file: 1. To make sure the key is stored off the computer somewhere safely. . . . → Read More: How to export your public key to an ASCII / text file in GnuPG

How to list GnuPG or GPG secret keys

When you create or generate a new GPG or GnuPG key pair, it is stored in your key ring. Keys stored within the key ring can be listed using using the command as below in the Linux terminal.

$ gpg –list-secret-keys <enter>

/home/user/.gnupg/secring.gpg —————————— sec 4096R/3949C65A 2014-11-28 [expires: 2015-11-28] uid John N. Doe <john.doe@emaildomain.com> ssb . . . → Read More: How to list GnuPG or GPG secret keys

K-9 eMail client for Android and APG for GPG (PGP) encryption

Most folks using smart phones go with the default email application of Android. This is the default GMail application or the standard email application.

The post encourages you to use K-9 Email Client on Android. It is to let you know how you can install a better application that supports more email services and features. . . . → Read More: K-9 eMail client for Android and APG for GPG (PGP) encryption

Which online data storage service should you use?

With advent of users having multiple devices and the need to consolidate data in a single place for it to be available on all those devices, online cloud storage services like Dropbox, Wuala, Google Drive, Skydrive, Box, etc have come up. I have only considered the free services.

Each of these services has their own . . . → Read More: Which online data storage service should you use?

September 2019
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